EDITOR'S NOTE

Stay home, eat fresh

As I sit here under lockdown pondering the meaning of life, it is clear that my focus may have been a little misguided for many years.

The coronavirus is in the process of decimating many countries in all departments. I think that in the coming months we will see more and more people realizing the importance of family, living, eating “clean” and fresh. This is an ethos that Catch Cook was founded on and am sure it is going to become the norm over time. With time on our hands we should be starting our own private veggie and herb gardens, there is no need to go large, it’s about using what space and resources you have available, even if it’s one small pot or planter – anything is better than nothing. Our Catch Cook Manager, Ray De Bruyn is leading the way, he has used limited space to create and grow some fantastic produce – I have asked him to give us a full break down of how he achieved this with tips and insight to start your own.

When the lockdown is finally over and we can get back to fishing, hunting, spearfishing, farming and foraging, I am sure many will pursue these endeavors more passionately to put fresh untouched food on their families table. It is obviously important to do this sustainably in the interests of continued harvesting and abundance and we will need to strike that difficult balance between consumption and conservation.

So, I hope that everyone will “Stay Home “for the however long this takes, be safe, eat fresh and when we can go back to our various facets please remember to “limit you catch don’t catch your limit”

Dean Dickinson

In saying this, the lockdown has made us think outside the box when it comes to the storage and preparation of fresh produce. Taking tuna as an example, the day before lockdown we went out to catch a few fish to take us through the 21 days. Normally I will only eat tuna fresh, but this time I carefully cling wrapped and froze it for later use (the fish had gone onto ice and was appropriately bled). I defrosted a loin yesterday – it was still fantastic; this shows that with a little care you can preserve some of you catch for consumption later.

The next ‘quan-day’ was cooking this fish so it could be utilized over time – I experimented with doing a pickled tuna – this recipe is usually reserved for flaky white fish. Substituting the batter for sesame seeds, adding a few pieces of ginger and a dash of balsamic vinegar has taken this dish to another level. I have received the stamp of approval from my fellow castaways and shows that necessity is mother of invention.

So, I hope that everyone will “Stay Home “for the however long this takes, be safe, eat fresh and when we can go back to our various facets please remember to “limit you catch don’t catch your limit”

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