Doomsday Prepper's

This dressing is the coup de grace of many of my dishes, you won’t believe the versatility of this dressing until you try it!

Welcome to the Field Family compound, we are a bunch of closet Doomsday Prepper’s. Not to take away from the enormity of this pandemic but we must admit we were a bit excited to try our doomsday prepping strategies during lockdown.

We fortunately we live on a 3000m2 erf in the heart of the city with view of the harbour and sea. We have a fully organic veggie patch that unfortunately has been battered by the drought. We have hectic water restrictions in our area, so we have been using organic soaps when we shower outside and standing over a bucket to harvest the grey water. We use this for watering the vegetables.

We have a small array of herbs, veggies and fruit trees. It’s amazing how little you need to be self-sufficient. When lockdown was signalled we had three days to prep. The shops were a frenzied place of panic buying. Instead of hoarding toilet paper or storming the frozen food isles we opted to stock up on mung bean, lentils and sunflower seeds to germinate and grow as micro greens. Mung bean sprouts are a rich source of antioxidants, fibre, minerals and flavonoids. They are easy to sprout.

Our other super food on our lockdown menu is micro greens. We did not have much time to source a variety of seeds. We had to do the best prep we could in three days. We decided to just go with the easiest which was the birdseed grade sunflower seeds. As soon as they reach about 5cm they are ready to harvest. We cut them with a scissors when we need them and take them straight to plate. These are delicious and nutritious. The advantages to sprouting is that boost your nutrient intake, vitamin content increases when you sprout, protein quality improves when you sprout. Sprouts contain enzymes that assist digestion, sprouting improves nutrient absorption, most nuts and seeds are easy to sprout therefore easy to grow in a tray or jar.

but this is lockdown. It requires a bit of food licence

Heath Field

By day three of lockdown we were running low on fresh fruit and veg so were very pleased to be able to supplement our salads with sprouts and micro greens. We have an avocado pear tree and thankfully we are going into avo season. We have a very sad looking lemon tree however it does bear fruit. When in lockdown it feels like you always on the hunt for the next meal. So on day seven for lunch, we decided to haul out a piece of marinated Kudu steak from the deep freeze, a beaut of an animal that I had shot at one of last year’s hunts.

I went foraging for some green leaves, spinach, lettuce and rocket. I grabbed a lemon from the tree and missioned down to the bottom of the garden to pick a few avocado pears. I spied the sweet potato plant and it was looking sad, this normally means that the sweet potatoes are ready to harvest. I dug around in the soil and found myself a prize large sweet potato. I rinsed it, normally you let them harden off in a dry warm spot for ten days, but this is lockdown. It requires a bit of food licence. My mom chopped the potato into chips and placed them in the airfryer.

It took me a few minutes to sauté the kudu steak, as I like it medium rare. I chopped the foraged leaves, laid them on my plate sprinkled liberally with mung bean sprouts.  Layered the medium rare Kudu strip onto.  Piled on a handful of sunflower micro-greens and sliced the avo over the top. It was a veritable salad tower, delicious and nutritious. Lastly I cut the lemon in half and used half the squeezed lemon juice to whip together with olive oil to make a creamy tangy salad dressing. This dressing is the coup de grace of many of my dishes, you won’t believe the versatility of this dressing until you try it and sat down to devour this treat with a plate of sweet potato chips.

This dressing is the coup de grace of many of my dishes, you won’t believe the versatility of this dressing until you try it

Heath Field

Easy Mung Bean Sprouts

Place half a cup of sprout in cold water overnight. The following morning rinse them with clear running water, drain off well and place in a container covered with a dish towel to keep gogo’s/insects out and place the mung beans in the dark spot. No they are not hiding or shy!  They just germinate better in the dark J The following morning rinse the mung beans once again and check their progress.  Make sure to drain off all excess water. By the end of day three the sprouts should be ready to eat. Before you eat lay them all out and check for any hard bits or ones that did not sprout and discard these.  You are able to refrigerate for about two days before you need to discard them.

Easy Sunflower seed micro greens

You soak the sunflower seeds overnight, rinse and drain excess water off the following day.  Find a suitable container anything with do one with a fairly large surface area will allow you to grow more seeds.  Place potting soil into this vessel, note do not add any manure etc you want this growing medium to be sterile. Spread a thin layer of seeds over the surface and gently push them firmly into the soil, no need to cover.  The take a piece of newspaper and cut to size of vessel.  Mist the seeds well and cover with misted newspaper. Keep wet for a few days until the seeds begin to germinate.  Check the progress when you see the leaves wanting to pop up remove the newspaper, continue to keep them moist. As soon as they reach about 5cm they are ready to harvest. We cut them with a scissors when we need them and take them straight to plate. These are delicious and nutritious. The advantages to sprouting is that boost your nutrient intake, vitamin content increases when you sprout , protein quality improves when you sprout. Sprouts contain enzymes that assist digestion, sprouting improves nutrient absorption, most nuts and seeds are easy to sprout therefore easy to grow in a tray or jar.

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